Discovering micro narrative

micro narrative - the collector blog
The Dinosaur – one of the shortest stories ever

“When he awoke, the dinosaur was still there.”

Believe it or not, that’s one of the world’s shortest stories.

It’s titled The Dinosaur and belongs to Augusto Monterroso (December 21, 1921 – February 7, 2003) a Honduran writer, known for his humorous and ironical style in his work.

When it comes to writing, one tends to think that it’s necessary to count on plenty resources to find inspiration. That stories need to be long in order to deliver meaning.

Take another look at the first line of this blog post. You’ll see that all you need is a powerful idea to welcome as many interpretations as the universe has.

Flash fiction, a style of fictional literature characterized by its brevity, starts showing more presence on the world wide web through sites like Flash Fiction Online and Flash Fiction Magazine.

Micro narrative leads the way to compiling ideas for a longer composition. Sometimes, as a writer, you find yourself jotting down random thoughts without any connection between themselves. This literary style may put them all together.

Another tool that may you help with micro narrative is Twitter. You have 140 characters to tell a story. Great way to train your mind to express in a few words.

Play with ideas and possibilities. Starting small can bring some great results.

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Museums trigger creativity

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Palacio de Bellas Artes in Mexico City

Last month I visited Palacio de Bellas Artes in Mexico City.

It is one of the most iconic museums in Mexico. It’s a must to be there!

In December, there was an exposition on Russian art that displayed propaganda posters as well as drawings that illustrated influences from cubism.

There was a specific room for all visitors to play with cubes and build anything with them to interact and experience that kind of art. This is brilliant. It’s the first time that I find this possibility in a museum.

Then, in a different exposition, the murals painted by Diego Rivera and David Alfaro Siqueiros portayed the essence of the Mexican history. My mom and I were analyzing them, and figuring out the meaning behind them. We came to so many conclusions together.

It was really constructive to exchange ideas on what we were appreciating.

In that very moment, I realized that it’s important to have pen and paper when visiting a museum. I felt so bad for not having any of those elements. (What kind of journalist am I?)

Therefore, next time I visit a museum, it’s mandatory to have them because of the following reasons:

  • Further research on a topic or artist can be conducted later on. Keywords are necessary for that.
  • It’s possible to come up with ideas to design, illustrate and photograph. Inspiration might catch you there!
  • Thoughts and interpretations can be translated into ideas for articles or analysis.

 

Go for it.

 

Documenting epic fails

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You need to fail in order to succeed

We all love talking about our success.

That’s not a bad thing.

On the other hand, there’s nothing wrong with failure. We cannot succeed without it.

Thomas A. Edison once said:

I have not failed. I’ve just found 10,000 ways that won’t work.

So, from now on, I’ve decided to start documenting my failures to keep track of my progress.

I’ll start by sharing some pictures that I took for my Photo class. I had to demonstrate how the panning effect works.

There’s two epic fails and one small win.

Making mistakes is part of human nature.